Making Making Backpack

What did I make? A backpack! What did it cost? A fortune! What’s inside of it? A throw blanket!

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Okay, it’s not really an expensive trifle for transporting fuzzy throws. It’s just stuffed so it will stand up for these photos. So far I’ve used this backpack for an overnight trip, a picnic, and a Trader Joe’s snack run (R.I.P. dark chocolate peanut butter cups, gone too soon. I’ll buy more), and it’s been a trooper!

This is the Noodlehead Making Backpack, a PDF pattern I bought last November. This is the only bag I’ve sewn in the last several years, and the first backpack ever. I finally sewed it because of the release of the Raspberry Rucksack pattern, which I purchased pretty much instantaneously! One backpack pattern marinating in the stash is one thing, but two? That’s one too many, pal. For…some reason. Who knows, but it got me started.

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The single best purchase I made for this project was the official hardware and zipper kit. I’m sure there’s a cheaper way to assemble those supplies, but I couldn’t find them locally, and I hate, hate, hate shipping things if I can otherwise avoid it. Buying in one place cut down on 1) shipping costs 2) environmental costs (less packaging, less fuel) and 3) stress. For a backpack first-timer, there was nothing like the peace of mind of needing a certain ring or strap width, puttering over to my manila envelope, and fishing it out, no further questions.

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My ultimately least successful notions purchase was Otter Wax! This isn’t a poor review of the product, just good ol’ fashioned user error. I thought I could wax the leftover linen/cotton from my Flint shorts and get a piece of fabric as thick and heavy and waterproof as storebought waxed canvas. You might see the flaw in my plan – part of the operative phrase there is ‘canvas’. One small bar of wax was more than enough for 1 yard of fabric, but even coated as thoroughly as I could, my fabric was still essentially lightweight. And as far as I can tell, you can’t interface waxed fabric!

I dithered for a bit – I couldn’t find information about deliberately removing Otter Wax from fabric. Plus, the fallacy of sunk costs got me for a minute. But in a reckless moment, I threw the fabric in a hot wash followed by a hot dryer. The result? Fabric I could interface (though the bond was unenthusiastic), with no water resistance but a pretty lovely waxy aroma. That’s not sarcasm! I love the smell of wax.

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I had a packet of Merchant and Mills bag rivets sitting around, and I tried them for the first time on the front pocket here.  I wasn’t madly impressed. They didn’t seem very sturdy on their way in, and one is already scratched, just a few uses into the life of the backpack.

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I’m very happy with the quality of the Noodlehead notions, though!

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This project was all about the notions, too! I bought foam! I’ve never bought foam! It’s cheap and makes a huge difference to the final shape, I’m glad I didn’t skip it, even though I had some spending fatigue at that stage of the game. The only new fabric I bought was 1 yard of cotton for the lining. I love the colors of this design and I’m hopeful it won’t show wear and tear too obviously.

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1 yard was exactly right for all the lining pieces, with a big enough piece remaining to make enough 2” wide bias tape to bind all the raw seams. I initially tried running the seam allowances through my serger, to compress them and for extra security, and broke my very first serger needle. A lotta firsts with this project. In the end, I hand-sewed all the binding, and eventually figured out how to miter the corners (not right away, but inside a backpack is a good place to learn!). One pulpy finger, a bit of experimentation, and many hours later, and my backpack was done!

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I can see why people get a bag bug! I’m eyeing the Range Backpack next…and as soon as I buy that pattern I guess I’ll sew the Raspberry Rucksack. Time to emerge from my cocoon of rarely sewing bags to become the kind of butterfly who owns too many backpacks!

 

Pattern: Noodlehead Making Backpack

Pattern cost: $9.00

Size: NA

Supplies: scraps from Flint shorts; 1 yard of Rifle Paper cotton, Gather Here, $12.00; hardware kit, Noodlehead shop, $21.50; Otter Wax, foam, interfacing, Gather Here, $23.55

Total time: 11.5 hours

Total cost: $66.05

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